I fucking love Zorua’s Illusion ability. All the lols~

I fucking love Zorua’s Illusion ability. All the lols~


words of encouragement

julieyumi:

あきらめないで!- akiramenaide - don’t give up!

どうにかなるさ - dou ni ka naru sa - it’ll all work out somehow

がんばれ!- ganbare - work hard!

あともうちょっと!- ato mou chotto! - just a little more to go

やればできるさ - yareba dekiru sa - you can do it if you try

必ず目標を達成できる - kanarazu mokuhyou tassei dekiru - you can definitely achieve your goal

ファイト!- fight! - go for it!


videohall:

For some reason a bird speaking Japanese is mildly off putting.

> Literal translation

Bird:” ‘Uhm Hello, this is the Ono family.”

Bird: “What’s wrong?”

Owner: “Abe-chan, you’re a little too early. Once the phone’s picked up, then properly say hello.”

Bird: “Okay, understood.”

Owner: “Do you really understand? I’m counting on you. Hello, this is the Ono family residence in Gifu.”]

Bird: “Okay, I understand!”

Owner: “Got it.”

> That’s clearly some sort of Pokemon.


Playing Pokemon reborn and look at my sweet babeh starter. So in love. 

Playing Pokemon reborn and look at my sweet babeh starter. So in love. 


Selling this stuff for Paypal! Inbox me inquiries.

Selling this stuff for Paypal! Inbox me inquiries.


Inbox Me An Anime~
Naruto: Have you ever been betrayed by someone you thought of as family?
Dragonball Z: If you could have one wish, what would it be?
Mirai Nikki: Kill your only love or be killed by your only love. Pick one
Stein's Gate: If you ever had the chance to speak to a past version of yourself, what would you tell them?
Death Note: If you can kill someone without anyone knowing it was you, would you do it?
Code Geass: In order to change the world would you work within or against the system?
Attack on Titan: Eren or Levi?
Pokemon: If you can have a real life pokemon, who would it be?
Sword Art Online: You are playing a game where you have one life. If you die in that game you die irl. Only way out is to beat the game. Do you actually try to beat the game? Or just quietly live in your simulated reality safe, but unable to return to reality?
Dangan Ronpa: You are drafted to attend a prestigious school for an outstanding talent of yours, what talent would that be?
Neon Genesis Evangelion: Do you think a world where everyone completely understands each other necessarily means a better world?
Bakemonogatari: Would you (and only you) live a life of immortality?
Full Metal Alchemist: Greed, Envy, Lust, Pride, Wrath, Gluttony, Sloth: Pick the 3 you feel pertain to you most.
Shingeki no Kyojin: Would you knowingly be part of a secret society where you enjoy a lavish life at the expense of the vast majority of the rest of the world?
Bleach: Would you ever bleach your hair?
Psycho-Pass: Is there such thing as absolute "good"? Provide an example if you believe so. Either way, explain your choice.
Bob Esponja: Is this the Krusty Krab?
Eden of the East: You are granted a large sum of money. What do you spend it on?
Another: You are alive but everyone around you pretends you don't exist. Since you can't have any people in your life, what do you turn to to fill that void of lonliness?
Kill La Kill: What are some of your favorite places to shop for clothes?
Sakurasou no Pet Na Kanojo: Have you ever envied someone so close to you that it put a strain on your relationship with them?
Panty and Stocking with Garterbelt: Is losing your virginity a significant thing to you?
Gurren Lagann: Who is someone you always can believe in?
Aku No Hana: Was there anyone in your life that helped you come to learn/understand/accept something about yourself that you never would have without them?
Samurai Champloo: Is there anyone from your past that you haven't seen or heard from in years but you still think about from time to time (Where are they? How are they doing now? Do they still think about me? etc.)
Kyoukai no Kanata: Glasses or contacts?
Deadman Wonderland: You are wrongly sentenced to the death penalty. You are allowed to speak to one person. Who is that person?
Elfen Lied: What is something you want wiped from your memory?
Inuyasha: What era of time would you like to visit?
Yu-Gi-Oh: Do you prefer games of skill or games of chance?
FLCL: Do you play an instrument? If not, what instrument are you interested in playing?

tits-n-t4ts:

Roses are red
Your underwear is lace
Take it off
Then sit on my face


spyders-georg:

tombol-r:

the only christmas grarrl that needs to exist

ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS

spyders-georg:

tombol-r:

the only christmas grarrl that needs to exist

ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS


ousto:

nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese
A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.
The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.
Resources:
[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site][Kana Invaders Game][Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.
Resources:
[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.[Most Common Words List][Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.
Resources:
[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through Mnemonics.[WaniKani] by the same people ho make TextFugu (below) can help you learn Kanji from scratch.[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.
If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.
Resources:
[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

The Fun Parts: Using Japanese Online Media
So you probably have learnt Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your learning advantage!
Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in. Try translating Japanese songs, etc.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!
For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

Any more tips? Comment below!

This is a great starting point, and I seriously can’t stress enough how amazing Anki is. USE IT! There are sooo many decks for it out there already made, which makes it easy for busy people to always learn new things, since it’s all in the program for you.
I would say though, you don’t necessarily have to wait to do Kanji and grammar that late. Having an understanding of kanji can REALLY help when learning vocabulary. And grammar is something you can squeeze in anywhere by reading the multiple guides out there.
But for the kanji, I can’t stress how much doing Remembering the Kanji has helped me in my studies and boosting my confidence. It doesn’t teach you the readings, and it takes a lot of effort to get through it (for what seems like little to no ability to actually read Japanese) but it will teach you how to recognize the kanji, so that they aren’t just a bunch of random lines to you anymore, and actually make sense. And now that I’m doing Vocabulary after it (through an optimized Anki deck set up so that each word builds off the other, which is better than just studying random lists) I’m so glad I dd RtK. My eyes don’t just gloss over the kanji not understanding how they’re made up like they did before I started studying, I’m actually reading and remembering them. Even though I can’t read tons of Kanji yet, it feels like the biggest hurdle is over, which is a very good feeling since Kanji always seemed like this gigantic wall, but now I’m picking up the readings sooo fast.

ousto:

nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese

A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.

The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.

Resources:

[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)
[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site]
[Kana Invaders Game]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.

Resources:

[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.
[Most Common Words List]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.

Resources:

[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through Mnemonics.[WaniKani] by the same people ho make TextFugu (below) can help you learn Kanji from scratch.
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.

If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.

Resources:

[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.
[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

The Fun Parts: Using Japanese Online Media

So you probably have learnt Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your learning advantage!

Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in. Try translating Japanese songs, etc.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!

For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

http://nadinenihongo.tumblr.com/post/47984748297/ultimate-japanese-resources-list

Any more tips? Comment below!

This is a great starting point, and I seriously can’t stress enough how amazing Anki is. USE IT! There are sooo many decks for it out there already made, which makes it easy for busy people to always learn new things, since it’s all in the program for you.

I would say though, you don’t necessarily have to wait to do Kanji and grammar that late. Having an understanding of kanji can REALLY help when learning vocabulary. And grammar is something you can squeeze in anywhere by reading the multiple guides out there.

But for the kanji, I can’t stress how much doing Remembering the Kanji has helped me in my studies and boosting my confidence. It doesn’t teach you the readings, and it takes a lot of effort to get through it (for what seems like little to no ability to actually read Japanese) but it will teach you how to recognize the kanji, so that they aren’t just a bunch of random lines to you anymore, and actually make sense. And now that I’m doing Vocabulary after it (through an optimized Anki deck set up so that each word builds off the other, which is better than just studying random lists) I’m so glad I dd RtK. My eyes don’t just gloss over the kanji not understanding how they’re made up like they did before I started studying, I’m actually reading and remembering them. Even though I can’t read tons of Kanji yet, it feels like the biggest hurdle is over, which is a very good feeling since Kanji always seemed like this gigantic wall, but now I’m picking up the readings sooo fast.


(Source: butt-berry)